Tag Archives: yoga essentials

Penny Slein Yoga – Wrist and Shoulder Warm Up

Simple, quick mindful movements for wrists, arms and shoulders. Aiming to mobilize and strengthen the joints and ease pain

Start slowly, increasing the number of repetitions and increase the range of motion accordingly. If you feel any pain then stop. This 5min clip includes wrist rotation, extension and flexion in seated and tabletop positions.

Like, share, save, comment and subscribe. Let me know what aspects of yoga you would like to focus on. Love, light, blessings to you and namaste Pen Xx

Also connect with me on www.pennysleinyoga.com info@pennysleinyoga.com or Instagram @pennyslein_yoga and Facebook Penny Slein Yoga or if you’re in Durban, South Africa book into a PSY class! Namaste, Love, Light and Blessings to you, Pen xx

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DISCLAIMER: All content on PSY channel is subject to copyright or other intellectual property ownership by Penny Slein Consulting. The PSY practice is not intended to be, or to replace medical advice. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise program, particularly if you are breastfeeding, pregnant or in recovery from an operation and/or accident. By using this channel you understand and agree that neither Penny Slein Yoga nor any persons associated with the channel have any liability to you for any injury or loss you may suffer in connection with the content.

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Penny Slein Yoga – 10 min Yoga Abs

Begin with a few repetitions then slowly build up to more.

There are so many ways to strengthen and tone your core and here are a few to get you to make the mind body connection, begin to engage your lower abdominals and whole body. * Pelvic rocks * Crunches * Figure 4 * Figure 4 crunches * Low boat pose * Supine tree * Eagle legs * Plank * Forearm plank * Sphinx * Crocodile – restore and rest Also connect with me on www.pennysleinyoga.com info@pennysleinyoga.com or Instagram @pennyslein_yoga and Facebook Penny Slein Yoga or if you’re in Durban, South Africa book into a PSY class! Namaste, Love, Light and Blessings to you, Pen xx

DISCLAIMER: All content on PSY channel is subject to copyright or other intellectual property ownership by Penny Slein Consulting. The PSY practice is not intended to be, or to replace medical advice. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise program, particularly if you are breastfeeding, pregnant or in recovery from an operation and/or accident. By using this channel you understand and agree that neither Penny Slein Yoga nor any persons associated with the channel have any liability to you for any injury or loss you may suffer in connection with the content.

 

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Penny Slein Yoga – 5 Min Yoga Standing Warm Up

Quick simple 5min yoga warm up and mindful movement for the entire body. This standing warm up includes: * Dynamic chair pose * Forward fold * Rag Doll * L-shape * Chair pose with crossed arms * Warrior 1 * High Lunge * Warrior 2 * Extended Angle I will post a variety of warm ups, sequences and meditations to get you started on your yoga journey.

Subscribe, save, like, share and comment. Also connect with me on www.pennysleinyoga.com info@pennysleinyoga.com Instagram @pennyslein_yoga and Facebook Penny Slein Yoga or if you’re in Durban, South Africa come join me for a class. Namaste, Love, Light and Blessings to you Pen xx

DISCLAIMER: All content on PSY channel is subject to copyright or other intellectual property ownership by Penny Slein Consulting. The PSY practice is not intended to be, or to replace medical advice. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise program, particularly if you are breastfeeding, pregnant or in recovery from an operation and/or accident. By using this channel you understand and agree that neither Penny Slein Yoga nor any persons associated with the channel have any liability to you for any injury or loss you may suffer in connection with the content.

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Penny Slein Yoga – Quick Yoga Warm Up

The idea here is to make a start. Even if only for a few minutes. Yoga is a practice that can enhance your life in so many ways

Begin with a few minutes per day and slowly increase. This is a gentle seated warm up including: • Dynamic wide legged forward fold • Extending arms out to shoulder height • Reaching for heaven and earth • Cactus hands • Interlaced fingers and cat stretch I will post a variety of warm ups, sequences and meditations so subscribe, save, like and share my beautiful yogis Also connect with me on www.pennysleinyoga.com info@pennysleinyoga.com or Instagram @pennyslein_yoga and Facebook Penny Slein Yoga or if you’re in Durban, South Africa book into a class!

Namaste, Love, Light and Blessings to you.

DISCLAIMER: All content on PSY channel is subject to copyright or other intellectual property ownership by Penny Slein Consulting. The PSY practice is not intended to be, or to replace, medical advice. Please consult your doctor before starting any exercise program, particularly if you are breastfeeding, pregnant or in recovery from an operation and/or accident. By using this channel you understand and agree that neither Penny Slein Yoga nor any persons associated with the channel have any liability to you for any injury or loss you may suffer in connection with the content.

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Penny Slein Yoga – Yoga for Beginners

Subscribe to PSY for regular, short yoga drills and dynamic flows especially for beginners, weight loss, toning, strengthening, mindfulness, balance and vitality. If you have a busy lifestyle and find it difficult to fit in much needed time for yourSelf (yes with a capital S!) then you have found the right place.

If you are wondering where to begin, how to do yoga or if you’re recovering and need to start slowly and carefully then subscribe to PSY. I will post regular short vids that are easy to follow and you can save for later when you’re on holiday, can’t make it to a yoga class or simply don’t have much time. Listen to your body Be Here Now Allow yourself the gift of time

SUBSCRIBE and also connect with me on www.pennysleinyoga.com info@pennysleinyoga.com or Instagram @pennyslein_yoga and Facebook Penny Slein Yoga or if you’re in Durban South Africa book into a class! Special thanks to Gerhard Britz aka Dronedad for the epic vid https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCges… Namaste, Love, Light and Blessings to you

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Roots of Divine Love – The Root Chakra

The first of our seven-part series, focusing on the physical, metaphysical and mythological/archetypal aspects of the Root chakra. Here, one can get a sense of the true nature of yoga, of which the asana practice (physical postures) only forms a small part of. The rishis of 5000+ years ago knew this mystical way of being and doing, and now it is available to all of us!

In the the sign of the fishes, we can connect today with inspiration (to allow for spirit to pass through us), art, especially poetry, imagination, and all the ways we can express that which is ineffable. With this little side project of Kai Von Pannier and I, we endeavor to showcase that yoga is so much more than just physical postures on the mat, and is instead a way of living and being, in alignment with our Soul’s expression.

This video is the first of our seven-part series, focusing on the physical, metaphysical and mythological/archetypal aspects of the Root chakra, revealing that for which we do not have words for, unless expressed through poetry, mythology and art. If we only think in terms of facts, we miss the truth and the magic which is right there in front of us. Please take 6 minutes of your day to let the essence of the root chakra wash over you, and connect with us if you wish to explore yoga in all its glorious facets.

Brought to you by
Yoga Essentials and Shadow Illumination Yoga
http://www.yogaessentials.co.za &
http://www.shadowilluminationyoga.com

Featuring : Monet Viljoen
Written and Spoken by : Monet Viljoen
Videographer : Kirsten De Beer
Produced by : Kai Von Pannier & Monet Viljoen
Production by Grand Polar
http://www.grand-polar.com

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WelcOMe to Yoga, the ideal starter mat.

No, that isn’t a typo in the heading it’s the name of Manduka’s ‘starter’ mat, the WelcOMe mat.

The WelcOMe mat is a soft cushioned mat and lightweight. The closed-cell surface prevents sweat from seeping into the mat.

For those of you who are beginning your Yoga journey the mat has am alignment strip down the centre of the mat to help guide you in your poses.

 

So get your Manduka WelcOMe mat now at Yoga Essentials.

 

 

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The natural way with the Manduka Eko and Eko-Lite

For those of you that want to practice on a natural substance, then the Manduka Eko and Ekolite is the mat for your practice. The mat is made from 100% sustainable non-Amazon harvested bio-degradable rubber and has awesome grip factor for the sweatiest of times.

It’s ideal for hot yoga or if you have very sweaty hands.

So now that you know that the Ekolite is for you, why not go to Yoga Essentials and order one now?

 

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Real Yogis Practice Pranayama

By Sandra AndersonpranayamaTraveling in Tibet in the 1920s, Alexandra David-Neel encountered a lama moving alone and fast in the remote Tibetan desert. “He ran like a ball bouncing,” she wrote, levitating with each step, moving faster than her entourage on horseback, and seemingly in a trance, unaware of his surroundings. Eventually she learned that the training for this extraordinary capacity is not aerobic conditioning; it’s pranayama, the mastery of prana. Part of the training involves sitting in a small, below-ground pit, using the breath and mind to lift the body out of the pit with the power of prana.

“If you can control prana, you can completely control all the forces of the universe, mental and physical.”

So what is this mysterious prana? Prana is our vital life force. It works through the mind and in the heart, in the breath, and in digestion; in walking, running, talking, and thinking; and in projecting the personality in all ways. It’s also the sum total of all the energy manifest in the universe. Swami Sivananda, an influential yoga master of the last century, writes, “If you can control prana, you can completely control all the forces of the universe, mental and physical.” This explains the prodigious feats of memory and strength traditionally associated with yogis—things like the power to fly through the sky, levitate, and control body temperature. But perhaps more to the point for us, by controlling prana, the mind is also controlled.Just to be clear, yoga is the mastery of the mind, and for yogis, pranayama is the ticket for learning to use all the wondrous powers of the mind. The yogic texts tell us the mind is tethered to prana like a bird to a string. And here’s the really good news: by controlling the breath, we can control prana, and thus the mind. And the really, really good news? Basic pranayama practices are both powerful and accessible to all of us.Though many pranayama techniques are not that difficult physically, sustaining a practice and developing the mind can be tricky. Here are six pointers for getting started, and for improving, sustaining, and deepening your practice.

  1. Steadiness of body: The body must be comfortably motionless for a prolonged period of time, and yet support alertness, breath control, and mental focus. Asana practice is essential for pranayama, partly because it’s nearly impossible to maintain a balanced, still, comfortable sitting posture for any length of time without it. Just as importantly, asana activates and integrates the flow of prana, helps us develop the capacity to direct prana with bandhas (energy locks), trains the body to breathe diaphragmatically, and develops sensitivity to inner states of being. Preferred sitting postures for pranayama are sukhasana (easy pose), svastikasana (auspicious pose), and padmasana (lotus pose), but sitting on a chair is also an option.
  2. Diaphragmatic breathing: Just as your sitting posture is the foundation for the body in pranayama practice, diaphragmatic breathing is the foundation for the breath. This is where deliberate training of the breath begins in earnest. Don’t assume that because you have been practicing yoga for years, you are breathing diaphragmatically. Our breathing patterns are typically subconscious—controlled by persistent habits that are out of our awareness. Get started with Breath Training on the Pranayama Channel at YogaInternational.com for tutorials and tips to refine your basic breathing pattern, balance the nervous system, and reinforce a relaxed state of inner equilibrium.
  3. Balanced lifestyle: Avoid too much or too little food, too much or too little sleep, and too much or too little mental and physical activity. Be regular in your lifestyle habits. A fresh, nourishing diet is particularly important.
  4. Mental/emotional stability: Here’s my teacher, Pandit Tigunait, a masterful pranayama practitioner, on the subject of emotional balance: “To get the benefit of pranayama, you must be steady in thought, speech, and action. Without some measure of contentment in life, pranayama brings misery.”
  5. Regularity: In general, the benefits of yoga accrue from consistent, systematic practice for long periods of time. “If one practices pranayama continuously for a year, he is sure to attain wisdom,” writes Swami Rama, a modern master who demonstrated extraordinary control over his body’s autonomic functions. “With regulation of the breath,” he continues, “karma acquired both in this life and in the past may be burnt up.” This is a big job, and progress is necessarily incremental. After all, it took lifetimes to build your unconscious mind and habits, so naturally it will take some time to reshape them!
  6. Inner focus: Success in yoga depends on this. Becoming sensitive to the flow of breath, the subtlety of the breath, and finally the suspension of the breath, leads you to awareness of the force behind the breath—prana. Awareness of prana is the thread that links you to deeper states of mental awareness, independent of the physical body and the senses. This is the beginning of mastering the mind.

Finally, (and thankfully), my teachers also have this useful advice: Don’t bind yourself with too many rules. So why delay? Start now, even if your sitting posture and diet aren’t perfect and equanimity isn’t your forte. In the memorable words of Swami Sivananda, “Start the practice this very second in right earnest and become a real yogi.”

 About Sandra Anderson

For over 20 years Sandra Anderson has shared her extensive experience in yoga theory and practice with students from all over the world. A senior faculty member and resident at the Himalayan Institute, her teaching reflects access to the living oral tradition, and the embodied experience of 30 years of dedicated practice. With a background in the natural sciences and interest in classical Sanskrit, along with frequent pilgrimages to India, Sandy has a rare capacity to eloquently convey the richness of spiritual life in our contemporary world. She is the coauthor of the award-winning book, Yoga Mastering the Basics, and was a contributing editor and columnist for Yoga International magazine. She is now a frequent contributor to YogaInternational.com, offering instructional videos and articles. Sandy leads workshops, trainings and retreats both nationally and internationally, and at the headquarters of the Himalayan Institute.

 

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Scientific Research on the Benefits of Yoga

ZID_1021_760_427auto_intWe all know that yoga does a body (and a mind) good. But up until recently, no one could really say with any degree of certainty why—or even how—it improves conditions as varied as depression and anxiety, diabetes, chronic pain, and even epilepsy.

Now a group of researchers at Boston University School of Medicine believe they’ve discovered yoga’s secret. In an article published in the May 2012 issue of Medical Hypotheses journal under an impossibly long title, Chris Streeter, PhD, and his team hypothesize that yoga works by regulating the nervous system. And how does it do that? By increasing vagal tone—the body’s ability to successfully respond to stress.

The Study: The Effects of Yoga on the Autonomic Nervous System, Gamma-aminobutyric-acid, and Allostasis in Epilepsy, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

What Is Vagal Tone?

Most of us don’t even know we have a vagus that needs toning, but we most certainly do. The vagus nerve, the largest cranial nerve in the body, starts at the base of the skull and wanders throughout the whole body, influencing the respiratory, digestive, and nervous systems. Often thought of as our “air traffic controller,” the vagus nerve helps to regulate all our major bodily functions. Our breath, heart rate, and digestion—as well as our ability to take in, process, and make sense of our experiences—are all directly related to the vagus nerve.

We know when the vagus nerve is toned and functioning properly because we can feel it on different levels: Our digestion improves, our heart functions optimally, and our moods stabilize. We have an easier time moving from the more active and often stressful states of being to the more relaxed ones. As we get better at doing that, we can manage life’s challenges with the right blend of energy, engagement, and ease. When we can consistently maintain this flexible state we are thought to have “high vagal tone.”

“Low vagal tone is correlated with such health conditions as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, and epilepsy.”

“Low vagal tone,” on the other hand, brings with it a sense of depletion. Our digestion becomes sluggish, our heart rate increases, and our moods become more unpredictable and difficult to manage. Not surprisingly, low vagal tone is correlated with such health conditions as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, and epilepsy—not coincidentally, the same conditions that show significant improvement with yoga practice. Researchers hypothesize that it is vagal stimulation through yoga that improves these conditions.

To test their theory, the researchers investigated practices they believed would increase vagal tone. For example, they found that resistance breathing, such as ujjayi pranayama, increases the relaxation response, as well as heart rate variability (another marker of resilience). And a pilot study conducted on more experienced yogis showed that chanting Om out loud increased vagal tone and the relaxation response more than chanting it silently to oneself. Studies such as this one begin to reveal how different yogic practices impact human physiology in different ways.

ABOUT Angela Wilson Angela Wilson, MA, manager of evidence-based curriculum for the Institute for Extraordinary Living at Kripalu, holds a master’s degree in mental health counseling from Lesley University, is a 200-hour Kripalu Yoga teacher, and has completed 250 hours of ayurvedic training.

https://yogainternational.com/article/view/scientific-research-how-yoga-works

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