Category Archives: Inspired Posts

What is the meaning of Namaste

The literal translation of Namaste in Sanskrit is “to bow.” “I bow to you.” Yet the true meaning of this word, like most words in Sanskrit, runs much deeper than your average greeting.

The practice of yoga reminds us that we are all interconnected. We are all unique, but simultaneously united in the human experience of emotions: upheaval, joy, sadness, and peace. By practicing yoga or pranayama (breath-work), we navigate away from the monkey-mind, swinging in the to-do lists of daily life. Instead, we journey inwards toward the truest version of ourselves and the present moment.

If we think of our yoga practice as an exploration or inquiry of the present moment, we may be going through different things individually, but as a group, we are all united on the yogic path.

How does this connect back to Namaste?

Well, when a teacher uses the word Namaste at the beginning or end of a class, what she is saying on a deeper level beyond “I bow to you,” is that “when I (the teacher) am in a state of yoga in me, and you (the student) are in a state of yoga in you, we are one.” In other words, “we are all different, but being on the yogic path unites us.”

Other translations of Namaste include the concept of “the divine light” that resides within each of us, and bowing to the innate goodness at the core of another person.

If you choose to think about yoga as a vehicle to reach your highest self or true nature, this definition may especially resonate with you. From this perspective, Namaste might be translated as “the divine in me bows to the divine in you,” or “the light in me honors the light in you – in this place together, we are one.”

Saying Namaste is the traditional way to end class. At a more practical level, it represents a teacher’s acknowledgement of her students. As a teacher, she is not above or better than her students; she is an equal, who bows to the divine that resides in each of them. In saying Namaste back, the student echoes back gratitude for the teacher and all the other students in the room. Gratitude for one another, the shared experience, and for the practice of yoga itself, is deeply embedded in this word.

Like so much of yoga and Sanskrit, the exact translation of Namaste can be left up to personal interpretation. Create a definition of Namaste that fits best with what yoga means to you and the value you receive from the practice. Then say it with abundance (or choose not to) at the end of your next class.

Since the ways we can think about these Sanskrit words and what they mean are infinite, please share your thoughts on Namaste or your favorite definition in the comments below.

Written by Brett Larkin
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Matthieu Ricard: How to let altruism be your guide

A fascinating TED talk (with some humour) by Matthieu Ricard on altruism and the future of mankind and our planet.

What is altruism? Put simply, it’s the wish that other people may be happy. And, says Matthieu Ricard, a happiness researcher and a Buddhist monk, altruism is also a great lens for making decisions, both for the short and long term, in work and in life.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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So Who Owns Yoga?

It is a really good question to ask, in this day and age of the many variants of yoga that are being created, the commercialisation of yoga, the attempts at trying to patent the filming of yoga training even!

This documentary shown on Al Jezeera News takes an in depth look at the question “WHo owns Yoga”

It’s a 50 minute program, so get comfortable and take the time to watch this!

Remember…don’t forget to purr.

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At the turn of this century, the Dalai Lama issued the following eighteen rules for living

Of the many problems we face today, some are natural calamities and must be accepted and faced with equanimity. Others, however, are of our own making, created by misunderstanding, and can be corrected. One such type arises from the conflict of ideologies, political or religious, when people fight each other for petty ends, losing sight of the basic humanity that binds us all together as a single human family. We must remember that the different religions, ideologies, and political systems of the world are meant for human beings to achieve happiness. We must not lose sight of this fundamental goal and at no time should we place means above ends; the supremacy of humanity over matter and ideology must always be maintained.

By far the greatest single danger facing humankind – in fact, all living beings on our planet – is the threat of nuclear destruction. I need not elaborate on this danger, but I would like to appeal to all the leaders of the nuclear powers who literally hold the future of the world in their hands, to the scientists and technicians who continue to create these awesome weapons of destruction, and to all the people at large who are in a position to influence their leaders: I appeal to them to exercise their sanity and begin to work at dismantling and destroying all nuclear weapons. We know that in the event of a nuclear war there will be no victors because there will be no survivors! Is it not frightening just to contemplate such inhuman and heartless destruction? And, is it not logical that we should remove the cause for our own destruction when we know the cause and have both the time and the means to do so? Often we cannot overcome our problems because we either do not know the cause or, if we understand it, do not have the means to remove it. This is not the case with the nuclear threat. ~ Dalai Lama

At the turn of this century, the Dalai Lama issued the following eighteen rules for living.

Rule 1. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.

Rule 2. When you lose, don’t lose the lesson

Rule 3. Follow the three Rs: 1. Respect for self 2. Respect for others 3. Responsibility for all your actions.

Rule 4. Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.

Rule 5. Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly.

Rule 6. Don’t let a little dispute injure a great friendship.

Rule 7. When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.

Rule 8. Spend some time alone every day.

Rule 9. Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.

Rule 10. Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.

Rule 11. Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you’ll be able to enjoy it a second time.

Rule 12. A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.

Rule 13. In disagreements with loved ones, deal only with the current situation. Don’t bring up the past.

Rule 14. Share your knowledge. It’s a way to achieve immortality.

Rule 15. Be gentle with the earth.

Rule 16. Once a year, go someplace you’ve never been before.

Rule 17. Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other.

Rule 18. Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it. Namaste.

source : http://www.the-open-mind.com/18-rules-of-living-by-the-dalai-lama/

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